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Rose Quarter Vaccine Mandates Vary
It depends on the event

The two Rose Quarter venues -- both the Moda Center and the Veterans Memorial Coliseum -- home to the Portland Trailblazers basketball team of the NBA and the Portland Winterhawks of the Canadian Hockey League -- has differing policies requiring proof of vaccination to attend some events, including some concerts. For instance, an upcoming Andrea Bocelli concert describes these requirements:

Rose Quarter requires all guests ages 12 and up are required to show proof of vaccination or negative COVID-19 PCR test within 72 hours of the event or a negative lab-based rapid test within 48 hours of the event.

Acceptable as proof of vaccination:

Acceptable as proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR or lab-based rapid test:

The Ticketmaster link for Blazer basketball games has a notice which reads: "The Event Organizer is requiring proof of a negative test or COVID-19 vaccination to attend this event. Please check their website for details."

The Portland Winterhawks hockey team does not seem to require vaccines.




--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2021-11-03 11:03:22Last Update: 2021-11-03 10:40:51



Negotiations and Threats Produce Forest Deal
Look for legislation in the 2022

Governor Kate Brown -- trained as an environmental lawyer -- has announced that nearly ten months of negotiations between private forestry representatives, small forestland owners, conservation leaders, and fishing organizations has resulted in a historic proposal for new regulations on over 10 million acres of forestland in Oregon. The proposal seeks to meet the federal standards for a statewide Habitat Conservation Plan. The changes to the Forest Practices Act agreed to by the parties will be brought before the Legislature.

In 2019, environmental groups created pressure by filing three ballot measures each of which increased the regulatory scope of the Oregon Forest Practices Act. IP 35 increased regulations on logging and aerial spraying near waterways. IP 36 and IP 37 each increased regulations on clearcuts and made changes to the Oregon Board of Forestry. These ballot measures brought the timber industry to the table and talks resulted in an agreement between environmentalists and the timber industry which resulted in the Oregon Legislature passed SB 1602 during the first special session of 2020.

Governor Brown made this statement:

“Today’s historic agreement is a perfect example of the Oregon Way -- coming together at the table to find common ground, to the mutual benefit of us all,” said Governor Brown. “Together, this agreement will help to ensure that Oregon continues to have healthy forests, fish, and wildlife, as well as economic growth for our forest industry and rural communities, for generations to come. I would like to thank everyone involved for their role in making this agreement a reality today.”

The parties agreed on a framework for: On January 12, the parties began a series of meetings in which they discussed proposed changes to forest practices, pursuing a statewide Habitat Conservation Plan from federal agencies for threatened and endangered species, which would provide more regulatory certainty for landowners and long-term conservation benefits to designated wildlife species. The parties worked intensively throughout the year towards formalizing an agreement to bring before the Legislature.

Legislation will be brought forward to the Oregon Legislature to solidify the Private Forest Accords in statute. The State will bring forward the proposal for consideration by NOAA Fisheries and the US Fish and Wildlife Service as a Habitat Conservation Plan.

These deals come at a time when lumber prices are at historic highs and housing availability is in crisis, and these regulations will surely put more pressure on these factors.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2021-11-03 10:40:04Last Update: 2021-11-03 10:25:17



Nothing to See Here. Move Along.
Courts are likely to approve of the Oregon redistricting plan

The challenge to the validity of the Oregon Congressional redistricting map -- including the new 6th congressional district -- as described in SB 881 has received a hearing. Martha Walters, the Chief Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court has appointed a Special Judicial Panel to hear the petition. The redistricting plan was created in part by Representative Andrea Salinas, who chaired the House Special Committee On Congressional Redistricting and drew herself into the newly created 6th district -- which has no incumbent -- and has since announced a run for that district.

The Special Judicial Panel, in turn and pursuant, requested and received appointment of a Special Master, Henry Breithaupt, Senior Judge, to receive evidence and to prepare recommended findings of fact in this case. It is considered to be predictive of how the case will be decided.

The report focuses on the requirements for the creation of a congressional district. It notes that they are contiguous, contain very nearly equal population and notes that "each district utilizes existing geographic or political boundaries. The districts utilize boundaries including county lines, city lines, state borders, highways rivers, shorelines, and the boundaries of the Warm Springs Reservation."

It considers split counties. The report says that "According to the statutory references to “portion[s]” of counties, there are 11 counties that fall within two or more districts" and concludes that "the vast majority of the lines that SB 881 draws across Oregon follow existing geographic or political boundaries.

Districts are not permitted to divide "communities of common interest", though this is not defined in statute. Most of the 78-page report is recounting testimony of witnesses who described how the proposed boundaries impact communities of common interest.

Likewise, Oregon law provides that "each district, as nearly as practicable, shall be connected by transportation links," and the report concludes that the proposed map complies.

The report considers whether or not the proposed redistricting plan favors "any political party, incumbent legislator or any other person."

Some Service Employees International Union Local 503 members testified before the legislature in connection with congressional redistricting. There was also an ongoing conversation between SEIU and particular legislators about redistricting that included Portland, the largest city in Oregon.

The Executive Director of SEIU Local 503, Melissa Unger, had ongoing conversations with two members of Democratic Leadership, Representative Salinas and Speaker Kotek, along with a chief of staff for Speaker Kotek, Lindsey O’Brien, during the weekend before the vote on SB 881-A that were focused on whether the map could pass through the representative legislative process, with a particular focus on drawing a map that Republicans would show up to vote on (as opposed to denying a quorum), which was SEIU’s primary interest.

According to testimony from Unger, “I was not involved in the details of the map, the actual, like, districts. I was involved in the strategy of which map would be acceptable to get the Republicans to show up and vote for it.”

Expert testimony from various academics with credentials in political science were considered.

In expert testimony, Dr. Jonathan Katz, a professor of social sciences and statistics at the California Institute of Technology who holds a Ph.D. in political science, countered Petitioners’ assertion that the Enacted Map contains five Democratic seats and one Republican seat, emphasizing that “this is not how we should think about fairness, which should be based on partisan symmetry” rather than proportionality, and determining that “it is not an accurate assessment of the map” since “Democrats are expected to win [on average] 3.85 seats assuming all seats were open.”

Similarly, Dr. Devin Caughey, a tenured professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who holds a PhD in political science from the University of California–Berkeley said, “There is, in short, little compelling evidence that the Oregon districting plan substantially favors the Democratic Party.”

On the contrary, Dr. Thomas Brunell, a Professor of Political Science and the Program Head for Political Science at the University of Texas at Dallas was dismissed by the report when he "reported that Democrats are “likely” to win in five of the six congressional districts under the Enacted Map, but he could not describe with any specificity or confidence how likely such a scenario would be."

The report concludes,

"No person testified to the legislature or has asserted in this proceeding that they are denied the privilege of voting for a Representative in Congress based on an immutable characteristic.

"No person testified to the legislature or has asserted in this proceeding that SB 881 prevents them from uttering and publishing their views on candidates for office in any of the Congressional districts created under SB 881.

No person testified to the legislature or has asserted in this proceeding that SB 881 prevents them from assembling with others, petitioning their representatives for redress of grievances, or instructing their representatives.

If this report is any harbinger, the congressional redistricting plan will be approved by the courts.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2021-11-02 17:46:42Last Update: 2021-11-02 22:12:47



Umatilla National Forest Wildfire Restoration Update
2021 wildfire interactive story map provided

As the smoke clears from the unprecedented wildfire activity on the Umatilla National Forest this year, Forest officials will be considering several options to restore the landscape within the burned areas moving forward. Fires burn at different intensities in different areas, so specific actions will vary.

Three large wildfires burned more than 150,000 acres total and approximately 105,000 acres on the Umatilla National Forest this summer. While all the fires are now contained, some hazards may still exist including burned or dead trees, stump holes, loose rocks or logs, or isolated areas of burning material.

After any major wildfire, the landscape is transformed from the soil up to the tree canopy. Post-fire recovery work and timelines are greatly influenced by the size and severity of the wildfire. Some activities, such as suppression repair, occur prior to containment to restore impacts from suppression operations, including rehabilitating hand and dozer fire lines, roads, trails, staging areas, safety zones, and drop points. Additionally, erosion control measures are implemented during suppression repair, such as constructing water bars (angled trenches) to route water and planting native seed.

Forest Service officials also assess hazards that remain in burned areas after fire, such as fire-weakened trees, rock fall, and areas of high erosion potential that can lead to landslides. These assessments are completed by a Burned Area Emergency Response Team (BAER) that comes in to evaluate imminent post-wildfire threats to life, safety, property and critical natural or cultural resource needs. BAER Teams have assessed and identified emergency treatments on the Lick Creek, Green Ridge and Elbow Creek fires that burned on the Pomeroy and Walla Walla Ranger Districts. Over the next several months, Forest staff will conduct emergency treatments, which include placement of roadside and recreation safety signs, replacement of damaged boundary and travel signs, repair of road and trail drainage structures, seeding around threatened and endangered species, and treatment of noxious invasive plant species.

In addition to these efforts, the Forest is developing long-term restoration strategies to help the landscape recover and become more resilient to future disturbances. Scientists and other specialists assisted Umatilla National Forest staff in identifying the ecological damage and making recommendations on specific actions that could help the area rebound naturally. Additionally, Forest staff are developing proposals for potential areas to conduct salvage harvest and replanting. Since the fire has burned in a mosaic pattern, there may be very different biodiversity impacts at different locations and elevations.

The Forest is also evaluating infrastructure damage from this summer’s wildfires, including campgrounds, day-use areas, bridges, roads and trails. The most significant impacts identified are to the numerous trail systems within the Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness. Trail maintenance and reconstruction, as well as removal of fallen trees, will be a recurring need for several years following the wildfires. This type of work will be part of the Forest’s long-term post-wildfire restoration strategy. Falling trees and unstable trail surface are currently potential hazards in the burned areas and the public should use caution when recreating in areas that have recently burned.

To keep the public updated on post-fire recovery and long-term restoration, the Umatilla National Forest has developed an interactive story map.

Updates on fire-related projects and restoration will be posted on the story map as they are developed. The story map also provides a summary of the 2021 wildfire season, interactive maps highlighting this year’s wildfire activity, photos and maps on treatments that aided in firefighting efforts, and continued restoration activities moving forward.

Some roads remain closed. Umatilla National Forest officials are evaluating fire closures regularly and will modify or lift closures as soon as it is safe to do so based on fire activity and suppression operations. Sites directly impacted by wildfire may remain closed after fire activity has subsided while the Forest assesses hazards. Falling snags and limbs, stump holes, unstable ground, rock falls, downed trees, debris flows, and landslides can all occur in a post-fire landscape.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2021-11-01 13:46:22Last Update: 2021-11-01 16:35:49



Low Barrier Shelters in Oregon
Eliminating barriers such as sobriety standards

There are homeless and then there are unsheltered. In 2020, Oregon reported a total of 14,655 homeless, a decline of about 1200 from 2019. Out of the total, there are 4,123 whom are chronically homeless individuals, and 35-40 percent of homeless suffer from some form of mental illness. While national homeless numbers increased by 2%, Oregon saw an 8% decrease. Since 2020, Oregon has taken significant steps to further help the homeless.

The Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) established goals in 2019 for ending homelessness that includes encouraging low-barrier, safe and housing-focused shelters. A “low-barrier” center operates 24/7, and provides intensive case management to connect people to public benefits, health services, and permanent housing, through a Housing First philosophy. Shelters ensure immediate access by lowering or eliminating barriers such as sobriety standards, pet restrictions, restrictions based on identification, income, background checks, and requirements for participation in programs. Storage is required for weapons and drugs, however, they can be retrieved upon exiting the shelter. When they show up, the doors are open providing a safe, warm place for those who may not have other options.

In 2021 session, Speaker Kotek passed HB 2004, which appropriates $7 million in General Fund to OHCS, and $2 million for technical assistance for low-barrier emergency shelters or transitional housing to accommodate the unhoused from wildfires. Moneys went to establish navigation centers in the following jurisdictions: $1.5 million to the City of McMinnville; $1.5 million to the City of Roseburg, $2.5 million to the City of Bend; $2.5 million to the City of Medford; $5 million to the City of Salem; and $5 million to Lane County for a navigation center in the City of Eugene. Navigation centers are defined as low-barrier emergency shelters open seven days per week with the purpose of connecting homeless individuals and families with health services, permanent housing, and public benefits.

Many cities have also received funding from the federal COVID-19 relief funds received last year. It has provided startup and maybe the first-year operations, but various options for long-term funding is still on the table.

Salem opened Tanner House as their first low-barrier veterans housing project. Tanner House offers mental health support, peer support, and drug and alcohol case management. A front office accommodates veterans that walk in off the street that need linked to services.

The City of Bend converted their winter shelter into a year-round low-barrier homeless shelter. As with most cities, a nonprofit runs the 70-bed shelter. The nonprofit, Shepherd’s House Ministries, also provides case management and supportive services. The Council’s goal is to expand to 500 beds in a three-year action plan. There are nearly 1,000 homeless in Central Oregon reported in 2020.

Outside of Portland, Eugene may have the next biggest issue with homeless camps. When City of Eugene Mayor Lucy Vinis was asked about street camps, she told Northwest Observer, “The folks who are disaffected from society and unwilling to change their transient lifestyle are much harder to persuade to move into any kind of shelter or managed site – and I don’t imagine hotels are any better for them than any number of other options, but I could be wrong. They really present our biggest problem.”

Mayor Vinis describes the type of homeless that low-barrier shelters are meant to accommodate. The chronically homeless with physical and mental needs that are not likely to ever be transitioned back into society or a productive life style. They are not suited for micro-shelters or villages. The question is, will low-barrier centers provide a safe shelter and encourage treatment, or will it be a protected drug haven?


--Donna Bleiler

Post Date: 2021-10-31 09:36:55Last Update: 2021-10-30 15:09:57



Governor Brown Gets the Booster Jab
“All three of the vaccines are safe, and incredibly effective”

Governor Kate Brown today issued the following statement after receiving her COVID-19 booster shot and flu vaccine at Salem Health’s Edgewater Clinic:

"I am extremely grateful for the protection the Johnson & Johnson vaccine has given me. All three of the vaccines are safe, and incredibly effective at protecting against hospitalization and death. And now, I am grateful to have received extra protection against both COVID-19 and the flu with the Moderna booster shot and the flu shot.

"Many Oregonians are now eligible for a booster -- I encourage you to have conversations with your health care provider, like I have with my doctor, Dr. Yates, to learn more about the extra protection a booster can offer you. Vaccinations are our way out of this pandemic. If you still have questions about getting vaccinated, call your doctor or health care provider today to get your questions answered."

“The COVID-19 booster is safe and effective in prolonging protection against severe illness. The vaccine remains our only path out of the pandemic and my colleagues and I encourage everyone to get the booster when eligible,” said Dr. Ralph Yates, Chief Medical Officer, Salem Health Hospitals and Clinics. “Flu vaccines are another important way to protect one another, especially as we head into the winter months. An increase in flu cases is anticipated this year, but flu shots can help. Flu shots can be given at the same time as the booster.”

Last week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shared their recommendation for recipients of the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. The Western States Scientific Safety Workgroup followed with their recommendations, which align with the federal guidance, and which Oregon will be following. All Oregonians 18 years of age or older who received a Johnson & Johnson vaccine should receive a booster dose two months after their first shot.

The FDA and CDC also approved the “mix-and-match” strategy. This allows anyone qualifying for a booster to receive any of the FDA-approved vaccines. Individuals may receive either the same or a different COVID-19 vaccine, depending on advice from a health care provider, individual preference, availability or convenience.

These groups of Oregonians who received the Moderna vaccine at least 6 months ago are now eligible and recommended to receive a booster shot: All Oregonians 18 years of age or older who received a Johnson & Johnson vaccine should receive a booster dose two months after their first shot.

Additionally, the following group of Oregonians who received the Moderna vaccine may also receive a booster dose after six months:

--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2021-10-30 10:26:54Last Update: 2021-10-30 11:03:22



Perkins Opposes Payouts for Illegal Immigrants
Asks incumbent Senator Wyden where he stands on payouts?

In a statement, Jo Rae Perkins, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, has expressed deep disappointment that President Joe Biden is considering paying illegal immigrants $450,000 per person for being separated at the border.

“We should not be giving away taxpayer money to people who illegally broke into our country,” said Perkins. “What sort of message does this send? Disregard our borders and you win the lottery. That’s insane.”

The Wall Street Journal has exposed that the U.S. Department of Justice, Homeland Security, and Health & Human Services are considering paying $450,000 per person to illegal immigrant families who were separated at the border. That means, a family of three, that illegally entered our country could receive over $1 million from U.S. taxpayers.

“Does Senator Wyden agree with this policy of using the tax dollars of hardworking Americans to pay “illegals”? He needs to let the taxpayers of Oregon know where he stands on this crazy idea being proposed by his choice for President,” said Perkins.

“Our country is $28 trillion in debt and each taxpayer owes $226,000 for the debt. Now Biden wants to hand out $1 million to illegal families. It is outrageous. This is taxpayer abuse! Moreover, this will create an even bigger crisis at the border,” said Perkins. “As the next Senator from and for Oregon, I want to tighten up regulations to end illegals receiving taxpayer funded benefits. The thought of giving payouts is un-American.”


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2021-10-30 10:13:05



Canby Ferry to Re-Open
It has been in operation for over a century, except in 1946 when heavy flooding swept the ferry and its moorings down river

The Canby Ferry will be open to the traveling public at 6:30 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 30. The ferry was previously closed due to staffing constraints.

The Canby Ferry, located at 4116 North Locust Street, crosses the Willamette River between Canby and Wilsonville.

The ferry accommodates cars, bikes and pedestrians, and runs seven days a week from 6:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. except on major holidays and when the water level rises to 70 feet or higher, or during inclement weather.

The ferry has been in operation for over a century, opening in 1914. It has operated more or less continuously since then except when it closed in 1946 when heavy flooding swept the ferry and its moorings down river, part of which went over Willamette Falls. With community encouragement, service was restored in 1953.

The Canby Ferry is the northernmost of the three still-operating Willamette River Ferries including the Wheatland Ferry and the Buena-Vista Ferry. Many have proposed that the ferries -- while they serve nostalgic roots -- may be replaced by bridges which provide cheaper, more-reliable and more environmentally sound transportation infrastructure.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2021-10-30 10:09:29Last Update: 2021-10-30 10:12:58



Oregon DMV Moratorium Ending Soon
Reminder to renew before end of the year

The Oregon law enforcement moratorium for expired vehicle registration, driver licenses and ID cards will end Dec. 31. If you need to renew, you may want to do it as soon as you can – before an expected rush at the end of the year.

Starting in November, DMV will mail about 300,000 Oregon residents who have expired vehicle registrations, urging them to renew before the end of the year. This mailing is in addition to the regular reminder DMV sends a few weeks before your vehicle’s tags expire.

DMV will not also send a second reminder for expired licenses, permits and ID cards, so you may want to check your card to make sure it’s still valid.

“You might receive a reminder in the mail even if it doesn’t seem to apply to you,” DMV Administrator Amy Joyce said. “Did you sell your car? If you didn’t notify DMV, we might still show you as the owner. Protect yourself from parking tickets and towing charges: go on-line and notify us of the sale.”

The current moratorium, passed by the 2021 Legislature, is the last of a series of grace periods giving Oregonians more time to renew at DMV during COVID-19 restrictions.

“To help Oregonians get DMV services during the pandemic, we’ve added many new online options,” Joyce said. “We have caught up with the COVID-19 backlog enough that about half our visits to field offices are by appointment, and the other half are standby.” <

Before you go to a DMV office, visit DMV2U to see if you can get your service online – or make sure you have what you need to bring to an office.

“Going forward, customers will continue to have the option of making an appointment online through DMV2U or dropping by, as well as more choices online,” Joyce said. “Anytime you need a DMV service, check DMV2U first and see if you can save yourself time and a trip.”

If you need to visit a DMV in person – especially to renew your license or ID card – it might be a good time to get the Real ID option.

Starting in May 2023, you will need a federally acceptable form of identification to fly– most common are a passport or the Real ID version of a DMV credential.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2021-10-29 16:11:10Last Update: 2021-10-29 18:48:33



Grants Pass Mayor Seeks to Increase Vaccinations
Discussion based on soundbites and headlines is causing confusion and distrust

Grants Pass Mayor Sara Bristol is proposing a plan, including $300,000 spending to increase COVID-19 vaccinations in the city. As reported by the Josephine County Eagle Mayor Bristol sent an email to the Josephine County Commissioners with a detailed proposal for encouraging residents to get the vaccine. It's not clear from the proposal where the funding would come from.

In her email, she outlines what she calls a draft of a proposal:

Thankfully, Covid-19 case numbers in Josephine County and throughout Oregon have dropped dramatically since the peak just before Labor Day. And yet the county’s infection rate is still higher than it’s been for much of the past 19 months. Here in Josephine County, just 50% of our total population is vaccinated. We're not out of the woods yet.

Our local businesses, our children, our mental health and our quality of life have been deeply adversely affected by this pandemic. We need to get back to normal. Let’s work together to end Covid-19 in Josephine County.

The proposal has three parts.

The first part, proposed to cost $75,000, includes the creation of a "positive marketing campaign" and using that marketing theme, which she calls "JoCo Cares" and calls for providing "signs and banners featuring JoCo Cares theme, including pins and stickers that individuals can wear to show support, host[ing] a panel discussion with medical providers, city and county leaders to answer Covid-19 vaccine questions, [and] media interviews with the media and/or paid ads sharing “why I got vaccinated” stories."

The second part, also proposed to cost $75,000, seeks to "coordinate with medical providers and other community efforts to maximize resources." In addition to "direct contact from local doctors" it suggests connecting with "providers to encourage a call/text message campaign to their patients" and to "produce and provide informational flyers through social service partners, food banks, schools, etc. to help educate residents on the facts of the virus and its implications in our community." It proposes "outreach to underserved communities: homeless population, migrant labor, marijuana industry, etc."

Part three is merely to "provide a $100 Visa gift card incentive, first-come-first-served while supplies last. The goal is to encourage persons who “just haven’t gotten around to it” to make the effort to get vaccinated. The current incentive of $25 is likely not enough to motivate people to take action."

According to Josephine County Eagle Editor Richard Emmons, "42% of Josephine County adults have said no to the vaccination. More advertising won’t change a lot of minds. If parents want to pay their kids a dollar to eat their broccoli, that’s up to the parents. We shouldn’t bribe adults to take a medical treatment.

"Positive test results (aka “cases”) have declined for 7 of the last 8 weeks in Josephine County. We've gone from 900 positive test results in one week to about 150. That's an amazing turnaround and suggests the pandemic is behind us."

In a reply to Mayor Bristol's email City Councilor Rob Pell -- who also owns Sunshine Natural Foods -- outlined five objections to her proposals, saying, "After reading your extensive proposal I feel it is missing the most critical aspects of the Covid discussion that may help our fellow citizens make well-informed decisions on this subject. It seems to me that basic Covid education would do more good than the financial schemes and incentives you propose. So the commissioners and my fellow councilors are clear, IMO the following 5 points need to be better understood by many and unfortunately you didn't touch on any of them."

Councilor Pell concludes:

Discussion based on soundbites and headlines rather than discussion that is based on clear and objective data is causing confusion and distrust across many demographics in JoCo. The mandate of vaccines by school districts and Asante for the Covid recovered is baseless (see the 15 studies that address this concept in #3) and possibly more than any other single thing has seriously eroded credibility of the OHA and healthcare providers who continue to promote it - rightly so. Simply clarifying the 5 points I've presented will help our citizens have a better understanding of Covid-19 and what the vaccines can reasonably be expected to do so they can make informed decisions. I find the monetary incentives to be particularly gross. Since the vaccine only provides biological benefit to the recipient why would incentives be appropriate? At the end of the day I would hope we can agree that the public making more informed decisions would be a good thing.

Richard Emmons contributed to this article. He is the publisher and editor of the Josephine County Eagle.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2021-10-28 19:48:33Last Update: 2021-10-29 09:00:11



Legionnaires’ Disease Reported In Washington County
Murrayhill-area residents put on alert

Washington County Public Health is investigating six cases of Legionnaires’ disease in the Murrayhill area of Beaverton. The cases were reported within the last week in people who live within two miles of Murray Boulevard and Scholls Ferry Road. The people range in age from late 40s to early 80s; four have been hospitalized.

Legionnaires’ disease is a serious type of pneumonia (lung infection) caused by the Legionella bacteria that is found naturally in the environment and grows best in warm conditions. Common sources include hot tubs, hot water tanks, large air conditioning and plumbing systems, fountains and water bodies.

The county has not identified the source of the cluster and is alerting the public so people in the area can be proactive in identifying cases quickly and get treatment.

“People with Legionnaires’ disease may have flu-like symptoms including fever, tiredness, muscle aches and headaches, that often progress to coughing and shortness of breath. Nausea, diarrhea and confusion are also possible symptoms,” said Dr. Christina Baumann, Washington County health officer. “If you live in or frequent the affected area and experience these symptoms, please contact your health provider right away so they can determine if you have Legionnaires and provide treatment.”

The disease, which got its name from a 1976 outbreak at an American Legion convention, can be successfully treated with antibiotics. While most people make a full recovery, many need to be hospitalized. One in 10 people with the disease will die.

People are generally infected with the disease by breathing in droplets from a contaminated water source.

Most people with healthy immune systems will not get Legionnaires’ disease, even after breathing in the bacteria. Older adults, those who smoke, and those who already have lung disease or a compromised immune system are at higher risk and more likely to become seriously ill.

Washington County Public Health is interviewing people diagnosed with the disease and employees of local businesses and housing complexes to try and determine if there is a common point of exposure. Public Health is also working with Oregon Health Authority and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to collect samples and perform testing to link the cases to each other and to possible exposure sources.

Because the bacteria are so common in the environment, these investigations are difficult and time consuming. Washington County will provide updates as more information becomes available.


--Ben Fisher

Post Date: 2021-10-28 19:17:36Last Update: 2021-10-28 19:35:07



Congressional Candidate Comments on Illegal Immigration
“President Trump’s policies were working”

A recent report revealed that illegal immigration arrests have dropped to their lowest level in over a decade, which is a direct result of President Joe Biden’s open border immigration policy. Congressional Candidate Alek Skarlatos had this to say about the report.

“Once Democrats took control of Washington, Joe Biden paused on deporting illegal immigrants, now illegal immigration arrests have dropped to a record low and every town in America, including communities in Oregon, are border towns,” said former Oregon National Guard soldier Alek Skarlatos. “President Trump’s policies were working and this report is more proof that we need leaders like myself, who will stand with him in building a wall along our Mexican border and deporting those who illegally enter our country.”

The Washington Post reports that “Immigration arrests in the interior of the United States fell in fiscal 2021 to the lowest level in more than a decade — roughly half the annual totals recorded during the Trump administration, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement data obtained by The Washington Post. Officers working for ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) made about 72,000 administrative arrests during the fiscal year that ended in September, down from 104,000 during the 2020 fiscal year and an average of 148,000 annually from 2017 through 2019. ERO administrative arrest data is considered one of the best gauges of ICE activity because interior enforcement is entirely under the agency’s control, unlike deportations and other metrics that rise and fall with migration trends at the Mexico border. ICE arrests in the interior plunged after President Biden took office and set new limits on immigration enforcement, including a 100-day “pause” on most deportations.”

Skarlatos is a former Oregon National Guardsman, who served in Afghanistan and a candidate for Oregon's 4th Congressional District, running as a Republican against incumbent Peter DeFazio (D-Springfield). In 2015, while traveling on a train bound for Paris, Skarlatos, along with four others, jumped into action to stop an Islamic Terrorist who tried to open fire on a passenger train. His heroism earned him several awards and medals around the world including, the United States' Soldier’s Medal.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2021-10-27 12:38:10Last Update: 2021-10-27 22:47:23



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