For whom are you voting for Governor?
Republican Christine Drazan
Democrat Tina Kotek
Non-Affiliated Betsy Johnson
Some other candiate
Northwest Observer
Subscribe for Free Email Updates
Name:
Email:
Search Articles
       


Post an Event


Umatilla County Fair
Wednesday, August 10, 2022 at 10:00 am
Umatilla County Fair Aug. 10th-13th, 2022
1705 E. Airport Rd. PO Box 94 Hermiston, OR 97838



Tillamook County Fair
Wednesday, August 10, 2022 at 10:00 am
www.tillamookfair.com August 10-13 PignFord races, pari-mutual horse racing, destruction derby, nightly entertainment included in entry fee.
4603 Third St, Tillamook, Oregon 97141



CLACKAMAS COUNTY FAIR & RODEO
Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 10:00 am
CLACKAMAS COUNTY FAIR & RODEO August 16-20, 2022 10am - 10pm
Clackamas County Events Center 694 NE 4th Ave. Canby, OR 97013



Oregon State Fair
Friday, August 26, 2022 at 10:00 am
Which part of the Oregon State Fair are you most excited for? We'll keep adding to the fun all summer long!
Salem, Or



Washington County Candidate Meet and Greet
Wednesday, August 31, 2022 at 6:30 pm
Join our Washington County State House and Senate Candidates and Oregon State and National Candidates to discuss issues that are important to you, your family, and your community. Refreshments provided.
King City Clubhouse 15245 SW 116th Ave. King City, Oregon 97224



Linn County GOP Gala and Auction
Saturday, September 10, 2022 at 5:00 pm
Keynote Speaker Dave Sanderson, 2009 "Miracle on the Hudson" survivor.

linngop.com/galatickets
Linn County Expo Center



Washington County GOP Reagan Dinner
Saturday, September 17, 2022 at 6:00 pm
Tickets for Reagan Dinner 2022 in Hillsboro September 17th, now on sale at www.washco.gop, featuring former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.



Oregon General Election
Tuesday, November 8, 2022 at 8:00 pm
Statewide


View All Calendar Events


Kennemer to Introduce Tolling Choice Bill
“The current tolling scheme doesn’t address congestion, and will make traffic on local roads worse.”

State Senator Bill Kennemer (R-Oregon City) announced one of his two priority bills for the 2022 short legislative session is a measure, which if passed, would create an amendment to the Oregon Constitution to allow voters to vote on whether freeway tolls could be enacted within a 15-mile radius of a voter’s home. The measure is a direct response to increasing voter frustration with plans to toll sections of Interstates 5 and 205, as well as the potential for tolling the entire freeway system in the tri-county Metro region.

“No matter where I go in the community, one of the most persistent concerns outside of the COVID-19 pandemic that voters relay to me is their opposition to freeway tolls,” said Senator Kennemer, whose district is entirely within Clackamas County and abuts Interstate 205. “As the cost of living, including commuting, continues to rise, freeway tolls on our already-paid-for interstates will drive up the cost to go to work, take your child to school, or run daily household errands. We certainly need to increase our infrastructure, but as planned, the current tolling scheme doesn’t address congestion, and will make traffic on local roads worse.” Kennemer said toll diversion on area arterial roads like Highways 43 and 99, as well as the Oregon City Bridge, could make local traffic a nightmare.

As a then-State Representative in 2017, Kennemer voted against HB 2017 which created permission for ODOT to begin implementing a tolling scheme. He believed the freeway tolling measures, as well as an escalating gas tax and a sales tax on bikes, would price families and seniors on a budget out of having fair access to transportation. “In just this past year, we’ve seen gas prices skyrocket to nearly $4.00 a gallon, with a new gas tax increase just this week. It’s too much for lower-income and working Oregonians to pay. Tolling would be a huge family budget buster, and voters should have a direct say on the transportation package, which opened the door to tolling schemes,” Kennemer stated.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

If passed, Kennemer’s legislative concept would go directly to voters in the upcoming November 2022 General Election for a statewide vote. If voters approve of the measure, then any plan to toll freeways where a toll was not already in existence before January 2018, would be required to go on a ballot to the voters who live in counties within a 15-mile radius of the proposed tolling corridor. In the case of freeway tolls on Interstate 205, that would include voters in Clackamas, parts of Multnomah County, and Washington County who would have a say on whether ODOT could enact new tolls.

Kennemer noted that freeway tolls particularly burden drivers in Clackamas County where as much as 70% of Clackamas residents commute outside of the county for work, as well as thousands of students who commute from around the region to attend Clackamas Community College. “The daily cost burden for using a freeway that benefits all Oregonians and people from out of state, shouldn’t fall to the residents who live closest to the freeway system. If we need to address infrastructure, then it should be a statewide discussion, not just a burden shouldered by a few for a road used by so many.” Kennemer highlighted that ODOT will be the beneficiary of over a billion dollars from the most recent federal infrastructure package. He believes those funds and other sources of revenue could be bonded against, negating the need to toll to modify the Abernethy Bridge and widen Interstate 205 from the Stafford Road exit to the bridge.

“Giving voters the power to halt these tolls isn’t going back to the drawing board for infrastructure plans. While I’m committed to working on other funding sources for infrastructure that don’t add costs for drivers, I’m more interested in giving voters the right to weigh in on key decisions like enacting freeway tolls which directly impact their checkbooks,” Kennemer said. Absent new legislation to protect drivers, Kennemer says ODOT has plans to enact tolls as early as the end of 2023.

The Oregon Legislature will meet again in session this February. Kennemer represents Senate District 20, which currently includes the cities of Oregon City, Oak Grove, Canby, Boring, and Estacada. The district will include parts of Happy Valley and Milwaukie after 2022, both of which will also be directly impacted by freeway tolls.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-01-08 10:40:35Last Update: 2022-01-08 11:02:24



Pulliam Takes First in Oregon GOP Governor Cash Race
Fourth quarter fundraising results are out

Mayor Stan Pulliam has announced his 2021 Fourth Quarter fundraising results. Here are the highlights: "Unlike the big corporate and government union backed candidates in this race, our movement is powered by the Main Street business owners and grassroots donors who are concerned about government mandates, skyrocketing crime, and failing schools," said Mayor Pulliam. "These are everyday Oregonians who are voting with their dollars."

Mayor Stan's lead in both cash on hand and fundraising came through extensive small dollar fundraising via email, text, digital, and mail, as well as from numerous individual donors and Main Street businesses.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

His campaign was the first of any to launch a TV commercial for the 2022 election cycle. Next week, the campaign will embark on the first leg of its Main Street Heroes Tour, starting with over a dozen stops from Portland to Medford.

Stan Pulliam is the two term, nonpartisan Mayor of Sandy, Oregon.

He is running for governor of Oregon in the 2022 election.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-01-07 18:46:13Last Update: 2022-01-07 18:53:21



Economic Recovery?
“The State is a lousy parent, a terrible landlord and a bad boss.”

The New Year’s Eve brings out what people want to remember or what they want you to remember. House Democrats tried their best to make lemonade out of a year that was more destructive than good. They claim the COVID-19 vaccinations are bringing some normalcy and stability while Governor Brown extends her emergency order and wants to make masking permanent. They have to divert any success from the economy since Oregon ranks in the bottom ten of U.S. States for after-tax personal income per capita.

House Majority Leader Barbara Smith Warner said, “Oregon has been able to weather the COVID storm better than most states, and that’s because we’ve all come together to do what’s right.” She is referring to legislating “to prevent thousands of Oregonians from getting evicted, provide drought relief to rural communities, and fund services for Afghan refugees.”

Former House Republican Leader, Christine Drazan reflects on 2021 as a tough year. “Mandates impacted schools, youth sports and businesses. Illness, whether it was COVID related or delayed access to care, impacted families and health care settings, while so many of our friends and colleagues left the state this year in search of more opportunity, greater affordability and a culture of state governance that has integrity with reasonable limits in its scope and purpose, that doesn’t crush hopes and dreams. For those of us who have chosen to stay and fight the good fight, we have seen firsthand that the State is a lousy parent, a terrible landlord and a bad boss.”

Smith Warner lists eleven bills they claim has rebuilt Oregon’s economy in a way that ensures that everyone is able to prosper. It might be helpful if she were to define “everyone,” but one thing is for sure, they do affect everyone. If you aren’t on the receiving end, you are on the giving end. Nearly all have a General Fund appropriation attached whether it is a direct allotment or growing government. Reading through the list one has to remember how many billions the state received in federal dollars that is still waiting to be distributed. She contributes a good economic forecast to these bills:

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Perhaps trying to make positives out of negatives works for those receiving handouts, but for a real look at how well the economy is thriving requires a look at the giving end. Two factors contributed to a good forecast that has nothing to do with legislating funding. The reprieve for the economy in 2021 can be attributed to the number of people that are ignoring mandates. The stores and businesses that are thriving are those that may post a sign of the mandates, but leave the choice to the customer.

The second factor is that added operating costs to businesses are passed through to consumers. Oregon’s inflation rate with rising costs of about 8% over a year ago eats up a lot of the extra money and in recent months inflation has begun to outpace wage gains, resulting in less earnings. As long as consumers can support inflation, the economy forecast will likely be positive, but that seems to be changing.

Representative Drazan gives a brighter outlook, “The good news is that we have made it through the worst of it—jobs are plentiful, schools are open and medical innovation has resulted in approved therapies to treat COVID-19. There is light at the end of the tunnel.” Jobs being so plentiful, what was the reason for funding a recovery that doesn’t appear to exist?


--Donna Bleiler

Post Date: 2022-01-07 06:20:41Last Update: 2022-01-06 20:41:08



Fagan Denies Residency for Kristof for Governor
“The rules are the rules and they apply equally to all candidates for office in Oregon”

The Oregon Elections Division under the leadership of Secretary of State Shemia Fagan notified the Nicholas Kristof campaign this morning that it is rejecting his filing for Governor because he does not meet the constitutional requirements to serve. Article V, Section 2 of the Oregon Constitution requires a candidate for governor to have been a "resident within this state" for three years before the election. 

"The rules are the rules and they apply equally to all candidates for office in Oregon. I stand by the determination of the experts in the Oregon Elections Division that Mr. Kristof does not currently meet the Constitutional requirements to run or serve as Oregon Governor," said Secretary of State Shemia Fagan. "As Oregon’s chief elections official, it is my responsibility to make sure all candidates on the statewide ballot are qualified to serve if elected. The Oregon Elections Division and local election officials use the same standards to determine qualifications for hundreds of candidates in dozens of offices every year. In this instance, the candidate clearly does not meet the constitutional requirement to run or serve as governor of Oregon."

ORS 249.031(1)(f) requires all candidates to provide a signed statement affirming that they will qualify for office if elected. Oregon elections officials evaluate whether prospective candidates meet residency requirements by checking Oregon voter registration records. If those records are insufficient to verify residency, or if officials become aware of other concerns about residency, they ask prospective candidates to provide additional facts. Elections officials across the state routinely review the residency of prospective candidates; it is not uncommon for officials to reject prospective candidates who do not meet eligibility requirements.

"If Mr. Kristof chooses to appeal, the Oregon Elections Division is committed to doing everything possible to allow Oregon courts to decide promptly," said Deborah Scroggin, Oregon Elections Director. "My office remains focused on ensuring a fair process and meeting our March 17th deadline, after which clerks begin printing ballots. While the primary election is in May, for Oregon’s elections administrators, the work begins much sooner."

ORS 246.910 states that a person who is adversely affected by any act of the Secretary of State or by any order, rule, directive, or instruction made by the Secretary of State under any election law, may appeal to the appropriate circuit court. Oregon statute requires the Secretary of State to provide a list of qualified candidates to county clerks by March 17, 2022, allowing them to design, print, and mail ballots for the May 2022 primary election. 


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-01-06 15:18:31Last Update: 2022-01-06 15:40:53



Oregon House and Senate Leaders Resign
Speaker Kotek is running for governor. President Courtney retires.

Longest-serving Speaker in Oregon history led on progressive victories for education funding, health care access, housing, climate and more After nine years of what she calls "progressive accomplishments" as the leader of the Oregon House of Representatives, Speaker Tina Kotek (D-Portland) today announced she will step down from her roles as Speaker of the House and State Representative, effective Friday, January 21. Yesterday, Senate President Peter Courtney announced his retirement, leaving both chambers in search of new leadership after long tenures.

Kotek became the first openly lesbian speaker of any state house in the nation in 2013. During her tenure as the longest-serving House Speaker in Oregon history, she championed solutions to increase funding for public education, guarantee the strongest reproductive health care policy in the country, address the needs of working families, expand access to health insurance, address the state’s housing crisis, and reduce pollution that contributes to climate change.

As Kotek runs for governor, she will have to explain why she is swimming against the tide of common sense, when it comes to policy.

Kotek touted the passage of the Student Success Act in 2019. Her focus has been on increasing spending by increasing public education funding by over $1 billion per year. According to her press release, "The corporate activities tax to pay for these education investments has provided greater stability to the state’s previously unpredictable revenue system, thereby preventing drastic cuts to essential services during economic downturns." She fails to talk about outcomes, as she has presided of a decade long decline in public school effectiveness culminating in what one writer described as "Oregon’s New Graduation Standards Turn Diplomas into Participation Trophies."

In the face of increasing hope at the national level to dismantle unconstitutional abortion decisions, Kotek led the effort in 2017 to pass the strongest reproductive health care access law in the country, the Reproductive Health Equity Act. Thanks to her leadership, access to the full suite of reproductive health care will be protected in Oregon no matter what happens at the U.S. Supreme Court. In a time when many states across the country have rejected the expansion of health care coverage after the passage of the Affordable Care Act, Kotek pushed to ensure that all Oregon residents -- including illegal aliens -- have access to coverage regardless of their income or citizenship status. More than one million Oregonians -- about a quarter of the population -- now have health care coverage through the Oregon Health Plan.

Kotek also led the way , including year-over-year increases in the minimum wage, access to paid sick time and retirement security, and the passage in 2019 of a new paid family and medical leave insurance program that will make sure all working Oregonians have access to paid leave to care for a new child, themselves, or a family member with a serious health condition.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Though housing has long been among Kotek’s top priorities, affordable housing has become less and less available for Oregonians, highlighted by the passage of two bills in 2019. HB 2001 made Oregon the first state in the nation to force communities to zone for housing like duplexes, triplexes and quads in areas where they were previously not needed. SB 608 removed "no-cause" evictions, further driving up rental prices and exacerbating tensions between tenants and housing providers. Despite her efforts, homelessness rose to record levels under her tenure.

As Oregon and the nation have faced higher and higher prices on energy in general and gasoline in particular, Kotek supported the state’s "Clean Fuels Program" and supported the state’s commitment to 100% clean electricity by 2040, which included a $50 million spending plan to increase community renewable projects in Oregon. She also prioritized the passage of new regulations for the Metro counties to transition to cleaner truck engines to reduce diesel emissions.

As Oregon slides into chaotic lawlessness, "Making Oregon’s criminal justice system fairer and more effective" has been another priority for Kotek. She took up the recommendations of Governor Kitzhaber’s Commission on Public Safety in her first term to pass a package of reforms that many have seen as soft on crime. In 2019 she spearheaded the passage of a partial rollback of Measure 11 in the form of youth justice reforms to hold the worst of young offenders accountable in juvenile court where "their developmental needs are better understood and addressed."

Kotek claims to have "stood firm against extremists" to pass new gun violence prevention laws, and in the wake of these laws, Portland is now awash in gun violence. These laws include expanded background checks for gun purchases, prohibitions on the possession of guns by domestic abusers and stalkers, and allowing family members to obtain an Extreme Risk Protection Order to "prevent suicides and shootings in moments of extreme mental distress" -- by having what some characterize as an unconstitutional taking of citizens' firearms without due process.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-01-06 15:15:54Last Update: 2022-01-06 16:20:41



Salem City Manager to Retire
Steve Powers leaving for Michigan

Salem's City Manager, Steve Powers, announced plans to retire effective February 28, 2022. Mr. Powers joined the City of Salem in November 2015. He and his wife will re-join their family in Michigan.

"I can't thank City Manager Steve Powers enough for his outstanding work on behalf of the City over the past six years," said Salem Mayor Chuck Bennett. "His highly professional leadership during this period of COVID, homelessness, population and economic growth, a new Police Station, seismically upgraded library and historic improvement to the protection of our water supply. His retirement is well earned. I look forward now to continuing the City's work in cooperation with Acting City Manager Kristin Retherford and our outstanding leadership staff."

​Mr. Powers and his wife relocated to Salem from Michigan where he held the role of City Administrator in Ann Arbor. He holds a bachelor's degree in Public Administration and Political Science from Augustana College and a master's degree in Public Administration from the University of Kansas. He came to the City of Salem with more than 25 years of government leadership experience, which included financial management, economic improvement and expansion, and creation of community partnerships.

"Working with Salem mayors and city councilors, department directors, staff, and the community is a highlight of my career," Mr. Powers said. "Salem's use of the council/manager form of government is an effective partnership of policy and administration. We have made progress on community priorities established by city council that are essential to maintaining and improving the quality of life for all in Salem. I'm honored and humbled to have had the opportunity to contribute over the past six years."

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

In Salem, the City Manager is appointed by the City Council, serves as the chief executive officer of the city, and implements policies made by the City Council.

The City Manager is also Executive Director of both the Urban Renewal Agency and the Salem Housing Authority. The City Manager is responsible for: A nationwide recruitment for Mr. Power's successor, facilitated by a third-party contractor, will begin shortly.

Should the recruitment for Salem's next City Manager extend beyond March 2022, Kristin Retherford will step into the role on an interim basis. She has been Salem's Urban Development Director since December 2015. Prior to Salem, she was the Economic Development Manager for the City of Wilsonville for 12 years. She has a master's of business administration degree in sustainable development, is a past president of the Oregon Economic Development Association and the Association of Oregon Redevelopment Agencies, and currently serves on the Board of Directors of the State of Oregon Infrastructure Finance Authority.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-01-05 20:04:44Last Update: 2022-01-05 21:47:43



Sewer Overflow in Portland
Unsafe sewage in Willamette River

Heavy overnight rains led the Big Pipe system to reach capacity in containing combined stormwater and sewage.

An overflow to the Willamette River began about 3:15 a.m, Monday and is ongoing. Additional heavy rain is forecasted for later this week. Therefore, this advisory is being extended through Sunday, January 9. Avoid contact with river water downstream of the Ross Island Bridge.

During an overflow, and for 48 hours afterward, the public is advised to avoid contact with the river because of increased bacteria in the water. During all other times, the river’s water quality is supposedly safe for recreation.

The public can see Big Pipe levels at the new online tracker.

A combined sewer overflow (CSO) is about 80 percent stormwater and 20 percent sewage.

CSOs can occur during periods of heavy rain or snowfall. This is the first overflow of 2022 and the third since November.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Since completing the Big Pipe project in 2011, the 20-year $1.4 billion program to reduce overflows, the number of CSOs have dropped by 94 percent to the Willamette River and 99 percent to the Columbia Slough.

Before the project, CSOs occurred to the Willamette River from multiple outfalls an average of 50 times a year, with some instances lasting days. Today, overflows occur an average of four times per winter season, and once every three summers.

The Big Pipe system refers to a series of improvements, from disconnecting downspouts on homes to allow rainwater to be absorbed naturally in the ground to the construction of big pipes on both sides of the river and along the slough to store and convey large quantities of flows to the Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-01-04 21:55:53Last Update: 2022-01-04 22:11:55



Deschutes County Planning Commission Opening
A chance to gain some government experience

Deschutes County is seeking residents who are interested in serving on the Deschutes County Planning Commission in an at-large position. Applications will be accepted until Friday, Jan. 28 at 5 p.m.

The Planning Commission reviews land use policy and zoning regulations and makes recommendations to the Deschutes County Board of Commissioners. Members are the official citizen involvement committee on land use planning for the unincorporated area of the County, providing a forum for community input.

There is one vacancy on the Planning Commission for an at-large member. The at-large member will complete an existing term through June 30, 2024 and likely be reappointed for a full term from July 1, 2024 through June 30, 2028.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

The Planning Commission meets at the Deschutes Services Building (1300 NW Wall Street) in Bend, on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 5:30 p.m. Meetings are currently being held with in person and online options and many planning commission members are participating remotely. Additional meetings and locations throughout the County may be required.

Those interested in serving are invited to submit a complete application that includes a letter of interest and resume, describing their interest in rural land use planning issues and ability to serve collaboratively on a committee.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-01-04 11:04:06Last Update: 2022-01-04 12:04:19



2022 Gubernatiorial Campaign: Fundraising So Far
The card is full, but three are starting to emerge as fundraising leaders

There's still a long way to go until the May 17 primary and three Republican candidates have surpassed the half-million dollar mark in fundraising. West Linn educator and publisher and political newcomer Bridget E. Barton has the most cash on hand with a staggering $345K and the lowest burn rate among the leaders.

Barton placed focus on her outsider status. “I’m not a politician. Our beautiful state cannot afford another four years of radical left rule. People across Oregon want big changes that career politicians simply can’t deliver,” said Barton. “I’m an outsider –focused on solving problems.”

CandidateTotal RaisedCash on Hand
Bridget E. Barton$509,896.15$345,275.74
Stan Pulliam$673,325.66$247,516.06
Bud Pierce$849,559.99$161,015.29
Kerry McQuisten$88,406.71$61,519.23
Jessica Gomez$242,834.08$15,450.72
Jim Huggins$34,011.00$10,784.81
Amber R Richardson$3,346.00$360.17
Nick Hess$64,580.59-$14,105.13
Marc Thielman$51,407.63-$21,973.91
Brandon C Merritt$73,234.00-$31,572.67
Top total fundraiser and 2018 Republican nominee and Salem Oncologist Dr. Bud Pierce has pulled in over $673K and has $160K left to spend. Dr. Pierce has contributed over $360K to his own campaign and has probably the best name recognition of any of the Republican candidates.

Sandy Mayor Stan Pulliam has been working long and hard around the state and he has a broad spectrum of grass-roots donors. Insiders with the Stan Pulliam campaign have confirmed that the campaign has raised over $230,000 late in 2021 which has yet to be reported and is not reflected in the chart.

Pulliam reflected on his fundraising. "Unlike the big corporate and government union backed candidates in this race, our movement is powered by the Main Street business owners and grassroots donors who are concerned about government mandates, skyrocketing crime, and failing schools. These are everyday Oregonians who are voting with their dollars."

While there's still several months to go before the primary, one political analyst who asked not to be named offered this advice to candidates who've struggled to raise cash. "You have to talk to about 800,000 Republicans in the primary in May. Even if you go to all the Republican and right-leaning meetings between now and then, you won't get there. You need to have money to get the job done."


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-01-03 17:13:15Last Update: 2022-01-04 09:32:57



New Service Will Help Deaf in Traffic Stops
Alerts for law enforcement

For deaf or hard-of-hearing drivers, being pulled over by police can cause more anxiety than just getting a ticket.

The worry: The officer approaches the car, the driver doesn't respond to commands, and the situation escalates.

That’s one reason many states, including Oregon, are setting up ways to alert law enforcement that a driver is deaf or hard of hearing – before an officer approaches the driver.

Starting Jan. 3, 2022, Oregonians can add an indicator that they are deaf or hard of hearing to their vehicle registration, driver license, permit or ID card through the DMV.

The option places an indicator on their record, allowing Oregon officers to see the indicator from their patrol vehicles when they run the license plate or license number.

The indicator is voluntary, and you can sign up any time through DMV2U. If you want to add an indicator to both your license/permit/ID card and your vehicle registration, you will need to do each separately at DMV2U.

“This significant milestone is geared to build trust and cooperation between more than one million Oregonians with hearing loss and our law enforcement,” said Chad A. Ludwig, Executive Director of Bridges Oregon, “It will foster a better understanding of communication needs while protecting and facilitating a strong relationship with law enforcement officers.”

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Ludwig said over half (51.7%) of deaf and hard-of-hearing Oregon residents had difficulties communicating with police, according to a survey by Denise Thew Hackett, a Ph.D. at Western Oregon University. WOU published the survey results in a Community-Based Needs Assessment of Oregon's Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities in 2016.

This new DMV service is part of ODOT’s commitment to transportation safety and a direct benefit of new technology investments that have accelerated DMV’s ability to launch new services and better serve Oregonians.

Before you visit a DMV office, see if you can get the DMV service you need at DMV2U.Oregon.gov.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-01-03 17:09:10Last Update: 2022-01-03 17:28:49



Missing Signs in Newberg
A New Year’s Day update

AAs soon as the Recall School Board members petition obtained the required amount of signatures the lawn signs and field signs went up around Newberg, Oregon both supporting the petition and opposing it.

Door to door canvassing and social media punditry exploded as well.

Then the "No on the Recall" signs started disappearing. Several concerned and frustrated citizens sought to solve the mystery.

Field sign Erection Leader, James Goings said “they’re at it again”, referring to the chopped up, vandalized and abducted field signs of the 2020 elections in Newberg.

One conspiracy theorist claimed “it was a crime of theft”.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A break in the case came right after Governor Kate Brown issued her weather emergency. An unnamed neighborhood watchman used powers of observation to look into the matter. A freshly vanished sign had tracks in the snow leading away from the scene of its abduction. They led to the backyard of a home that had several other signs being guarded by the backyard fence.

The police were called.

When they arrived the confronted homeowner said he “didn’t know how they got there”.

With plausible deniability in play, no charges or arrests could be made.

Other field signs are still missing out on North Valley Rd. and not for the first time. The snow has melted, putting into question the validity of the Governor's recently declared weather emergency. The investigation continues.

There’s been one possible break in the case. A mask was found next to the spot where a sign used to be. It said, “if found please return to Progressive Yamhill”. No one is jumping to conclusions.


--Tom Hammer

Post Date: 2022-01-02 08:01:32Last Update: 2022-01-01 19:44:23



Top Ten Stories From 2021
The year in review from the Northwest Observer

Editor's note: These are the top 10 stories based on your clicks. Thank you for your support. Read on and see that the bar has been set pretty low for 2022. Have a great new year!

OHA Silently Rebuked by Oregon Court of Appeals
'Rules cannot violate law'
On September 29, 2021, Kate Brown's administrative state agency went a bridge too far with the Oregon Appeals Court.

According to a former state government regulator and CPS investigator source the majority of the ever-growing enlarging administrative state power over the citizen is because citizens bent to it beginning in modern...[READ MORE]
Friday, October 8

Beaverton School District Under Fire
A formal complaint has been submitted to the Beaverton School Board
School districts and boards are being targeted by CEI, Center for Equity & Inclusion, promoting equity and inclusion, another name for Critical Race Theory that markets their services to train and control the content and decisions once contracted. The contracts allow unelected personnel to make local decisions avoiding public input. ...[READ MORE]
Friday, October 22

Stan Pulliam Announces Federal Lawsuit Against Gov. Brown
'The constitution provides us specific guarantees of liberty'
Sandy Mayor Stan Pulliam is announcing a lawsuit to be filed in Federal court on behalf of Heart of Main Street, the Oregon Mom's Union, and several businesses and individuals. The lawsuit challenges Oregon Governor Kate Brown's authority to continue using executive action to maintain a state of emergency.[READ MORE]
Wednesday, May 19

Mike Strickland Goes to US Supreme Court
'I was just a guy standing there holding a camera'
Four years ago today Judge Thomas Ryan declared me guilty of 10 felonies and 11 misdemeanors in a Multnomah County courtroom. This involved the incident where I drew my firearm in response to a gang of thugs coming after me. I didn't even fire a round, as simply drawing was enough force to get the mob to back away and leave me alone. I didn't h...[READ MORE]
Thursday, February 11

Aurora Fire District Chief Blasts Kate Brown
'Our State government has been weaponized'
The Fire Chief of Aurora Fire District in Aurora, Oregon has released a statement in response to Governor Kate Brown's recent demands that everyone in Oregon should wear face coverings, both indoors and outdoors, regardless of Covid vaccination status [READ MORE]
Saturday, August 28

Why I Unenrolled My Kids from Newberg School District
'We aren't even helping kids pass classes because the focus has been lost'
Recently, I made the tough decision to take the last of my 4 children out of the public school system. I have always been a strong believer that we are our best advocates for our kids, and so we have looked for what worked best to help...[READ MORE]
Thursday, December 9

Medical Freedom Group Sues Governor Brown
The mandate violates the employment contracts and collective bargaining agreements
Free Oregon, Inc. has filed a lawsuit on behalf of several plaintiffs against the State of Oregon and the Oregon Health Authority for a temporary stay on the state's vaccine mandate on health workers, first responders, teachers and ...[READ MORE]
Tuesday, September 28

Vaccine Passports: Legal Action Taken
'This guidance puts Oregon at odds with the CDC, the White House, and nearly every other state in the country'
Oregon once again made national headlines last week for being the first state in the union to move forward with a vaccine verification system for its residents.

The May 18 Interim Guidance for Fully Vaccinated Individuals, from the Oregon Health Authority, reads 'a business, employer or faith institution that has a policy request...[READ MORE]
Wednesday, May 26

Union County Sheriff Sends Kate Brown a Letter
Says mindless dictates will no longer be tolerated
The Union County Oregon Sheriff has now sent Governor Kate Brown a letter dated Friday, August 13th, in response to the latest round of restrictions imposed statewide on Oregonians.

The letter reads as follows:
"I write to you today...[READ MORE]
Friday, August 13

Forever Gun Purchase Delays Considered by Oregon
Anti-Gun bill hearing scheduled for Feb 18th
Oregon HB 2543, which will allow the State Police to delay a firearm's purchase forever even when there is no denial on a background check, has been scheduled for a hearing on February 18th 2021 At 1PM.

The summarized language of the bill is exp...[READ MORE]
Tuesday, February 9


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-01-01 18:33:45Last Update: 2022-01-01 18:46:24



Read More Articles