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St. Paul Rodeo
Thursday, June 30, 2022 at 9:00 am
Hundreds of community volunteers work shoulder to shoulder for months each year to put this traditional show together, and we welcome the world to St. Paul for five days filled with color, action, excitement, and something for everyone. So, head on out to St. Paul for a fun-filled experience during our 86th annual 4th of July rodeo celebration of the American cowboy and our western lifestyle!

www.stpaulrodeo.com

Mark your calendars now and join the fun at the 86 th Annual St. Paul Rodeo June 30, July 1,2,3, & 4, 2022.
St. Paul, OR



2022 Lincoln County Fair
Friday, July 1, 2022 at 10:00 am
FREE ADMISSION * July 1-3 * Newport, Oregon

Join Us for an Old-Fashioned 4th of July Celebration!
Details & event calendar: www.thelincolncountyfair.com
1211 SE Bay Blvd Newport, OR 97365



Marion County Fair
Friday, July 8, 2022 at 10:00 am
2022 Marion County Fair July 8-10, 2022 Friday: 10am – 11pm Saturday: 10am – 11pm Sunday: 10am – 6pm
Oregon State Fairgrounds 2330 17th ST NE Salem, OR 97301



Linn County Fair
Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 10:00 am
Linn County Fair July 14 - 16 2022
Linn County Expo Center 3700 Knox Butte RD E Albany, OR 97322



World Athletics Championships
Friday, July 15, 2022 at 8:00 am
The World Athletics Championships are coming to Eugene this summer (July 15-24 2022), the first time in history that the championships will be held in the United States. This mega-sporting event will showcase the best track and field athletes in the world. The event will bring 2,000 athletes from more than 200 nations, all competing for 49 gold medals. About 20,000 to 25,000 attendees are expected per session, with most days hosting two sessions (both morning and afternoon).
Eugene



Lane County Fair
Wednesday, July 20, 2022 at 11:00 am
Lane County Fair JULY 20 - 24, 2022 11:00am - 11:00pm
Lane Events Center 796 W 13th Ave, Eugene, OR 97402



Coos County Fair& Rodeo
Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 8:00 am
Coos County Fair and Rodeo July 26 - 30, 2022
Coos County Fairgrounds 770 4th St, Myrtle Point, OR 97458



Malheur County Fair
Tuesday, August 2, 2022 at 10:00 am
Malheur County Fair August 2-6th
Desert Sage Events Center 795 N.W. Ninth St. Ontario, OR 97914



Union County Fair
Wednesday, August 3, 2022 at 10:00 am
Union County Fair August 3-6th 2022
3604 N 2nd St, La Grande, OR 97850



Yamhill County Fair & Rodeo
Wednesday, August 3, 2022 at 7:11 pm
Fair and Rodeo August 3-6, 7 am - 11 pm. Wed. Nitty Gritty Dirt Band; Thur. Jo Dee Messina; Fri. Shenandoah; Sat. Night Ranger Kids rides Adults $12 Kids $6 Exhibits; Demolition Derby Saturday 168th Annual; Oregon's oldest Fair
Yamhill County Fairgrounds



Baker County Fair
Sunday, August 7, 2022 at 10:00 am
Baker County Fair August 7 - August 13
Baker County Fairgrounds 2600 East Street Baker City, OR 97814



Umatilla County Fair
Wednesday, August 10, 2022 at 10:00 am
Umatilla County Fair Aug. 10th-13th, 2022
1705 E. Airport Rd. PO Box 94 Hermiston, OR 97838



CLACKAMAS COUNTY FAIR & RODEO
Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 10:00 am
CLACKAMAS COUNTY FAIR & RODEO August 16-20, 2022 10am - 10pm
Clackamas County Events Center 694 NE 4th Ave. Canby, OR 97013



Oregon State Fair
Friday, August 26, 2022 at 10:00 am
Which part of the Oregon State Fair are you most excited for? We'll keep adding to the fun all summer long!
Salem, Or



Oregon General Election
Tuesday, November 8, 2022 at 8:00 pm
Statewide


View All Calendar Events


Analysis: Oregon Redistricting
Kids Get Penalized When Adults Play Politics

Editor's note: This article appeared as a blog on the Oregonians for Liberty in Education site and is reprinted here, with permission.

After a COVID-19 timeout this week at the Capitol, the clock is running down on lawmakers, led by Democratic House Speaker Tina Kotek, to agree on new congressional and state legislative district boundaries by Monday.

As a result of the 2020 census, Oregon will gain a sixth seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. “PlanScore, a nonpartisan online tool that analyzes redistricting proposals for partisan bias, suggests the congressional map Democrats are hoping to pass is heavily favored in their party’s interests.”

As to state legislative boundaries, even before maps are redrawn, Democrats hold supermajorities–more than three-fifths of the seats–in both the House and Senate. The new maps are expected to further widen the disparity.

Why this matters for Oregon schools.

Democrat supermajorities mean education bills do not need bipartisan support. For example, on June 26, the final day of the last regular legislative session, SB 225 passed 23 to 5 in the Senate, and HB 2001 passed 20 to 8. These bills, and others enacted this session, are heavily influenced by left-leaning activists, the teachers union, the Oregon Department of Education, and Governor Brown’s office. It seems parents and students are getting short shrift.

SB 225 is about educational service district funding. But tucked into the legislation is the creation of a new statewide Task Force on School Safety, with membership appointed in part based on status as “historically, traditionally and currently disadvantaged or underrepresented groups.” The Task Force–which has some useful goals like developing a statewide database of school floor plans for emergency responders–must use an “equity-driven approach,” and will look at standardizing school safety statewide, which could limit local control of school safety decisions including school resource officer staffing.

HB 2001 is also about school staffing and was pushed by activist groups including Oregon Partners for Education Justice. It requires a “school district that is making reductions in educator staff positions to retain the teacher with less seniority if the release of the teacher would result in a lesser proportion of teachers with cultural or linguistic expertise.” The underlying goal of the bill, evident in earlier drafts: diversity-ratios and race-based hiring practices.

Scrapping standards shortchanges students.

Other education bills passed during the regular session include HB 2954, which “allows public charter schools to implement a weighted lottery that favors historically underserved students,” and SB 744 which eliminated the essential skills test–reading and math proficiency–required to obtain an Oregon high school diploma.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

SB 744 epitomizes the problems in Oregon public education today. The bill was promoted by the same group that pushed HB 2001, Oregon Partners for Education Justice.

In a breathtaking display of irony, the group claimed that "with SB 744, Oregon can ensure high school diplomas are rigorous, relevant, and truly reflect what every student needs to thrive in the 21st century."

As we wrote in June: “Oregonians should be wary of activist groups claiming–without evidence–that removing requirements makes diplomas more “rigorous.” Removing requirements is not rigor. Rigor is not equity. And equity is not equality or excellence in education. Whether or not adults agree on vocabulary, the bottom line is that SB 744 uses equity as a euphemism for scrapping standards and shortchanging students.”

ODE prioritizes ideologies over academics.

Over the last year, the Oregon Department of Education, under the direction of Colt Gill, has been busy issuing guidelines about quarantining kids and enforcing mask mandates. And they’ve continued to push ideologies over academics.

In June ODE paid $50K for two Nikole Hannah-Jones webinars, diverting funds from the Every Day Matters program aimed at addressing chronic school absenteeism. At that time we wrote: “The May 7 webinar characterized America’s past as a 400-year-old system of oppression and America’s present as irredeemable due to the ‘legacy of slavery.’ One panelist insisted that ‘slavery hasn’t ended.’” Now local school districts are baking this New York Times-based worldview into their social studies and new “ethnic studies” curriculums.

A more recent example of ODE’s push for divisiveness in the classroom was its September 16 resolution “encouraging solidarity and support for student identities.” “The Board’s resolution calls on the Newberg School Board specifically to reverse course on its efforts to remove BLM and Pride flags from school settings.” Should we hold our breath for ODE to issue a resolution in support of Christian and pro-life identity symbols? Should we be concerned with ODE’s heavy-handed attack on local school boards and their common sense policies which are the last line of defense against the left-leaning ODE and Oregon legislature?

We’ll need to play the long game.

In their editorial today, the Oregonian criticized the “Democrats’ anti-democratic power play” and called the redistricting “shamelessly gerrymandered.”

So we won’t have a level playing field, but we’ll still need a game plan.

Parental awareness. School choice and alternative education options. Common-sense local leaders like Newberg School Board chair Dave Brown. New leadership in Salem. Better curriculum for Oregon school children. Kids deserve to win.


--Mary Miller

Post Date: 2021-09-25 10:05:20Last Update: 2021-09-25 19:15:27



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