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Juneteenth
Wednesday, June 19, 2024 at 12:00 am
Juneteenth
Celebrated on the anniversary of June 19, 1865, when in the wake of the American Civil War, Major General Gordon Granger ordered the final enforcement of the Emancipation Proclamation in Texas.



Lincoln County Fair
Thursday, July 4, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.thelincolncountyfair.com
July 4-6
Lincoln County Fairgrounds



Independence Day
Thursday, July 4, 2024 at 11:59 pm
Independence Day
USA



Marion County Fair
Thursday, July 11, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://www.co.marion.or.us/CS/Fair
July 11-14
Oregon State Fair & Expo Center



Jackson County Fair
Tuesday, July 16, 2024 at 8:00 am
TheExpo.com
July 16-21
Jackson County Fairgrounds - The Expo



Columbia County Fair
Wednesday, July 17, 2024 at 8:00 am
columbiacountyfairgrounds.com
July 17-21
Columbia County Fairgrounds



Linn County Fair
Thursday, July 18, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://www.linncountyfair.com/
July 18-20
Linn County Expo Center



Washington County Fair
Friday, July 19, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://www.bigfairfun.com/
July 19-28
Washington County Fairgrounds - Westside Commons



Coos County Fair
Tuesday, July 23, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.cooscountyfair.com
July 23-27
Coos County Fairgrounds



Curry County Fair
Wednesday, July 24, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.eventcenteronthebeach.com
July 24-27
Curry County Fairgrounds - Event Center on the Beach



Hood River County Fair
Wednesday, July 24, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.hoodriverfairgrounds.com
July 24-27
Hood River County Fairgrounds



Jefferson County Fair
Wednesday, July 24, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.jcfair.fun
July 24-27
Jefferson County Fair Complex



Lane County Fair
Wednesday, July 24, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.atthefair.com
July 24-28
Lane Events Center



Clatsop County Fair
Tuesday, July 30, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://clatsopcofair.com/
July 30 - August 3
Clatsop County Fair & Expo



Malheur County Fair
Tuesday, July 30, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.malheurcountyfair.com
July 30 - August 3
Malheur County Fairgrounds - Desert Sage Event Center



Benton County Fair & Rodeo
Wednesday, July 31, 2024 at 8:00 am
bceventcentercorvallis.net
July 31 - August 3, 2024
Benton County Event Center & Fairgrounds



Deschutes County Fair
Wednesday, July 31, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://expo.deschutes.org/
July 31 - August 4
Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center



Union County Fair
Wednesday, July 31, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.unioncountyfair.org
July 31 - August 3
Union County Fairgrounds



Yamhill County Fair
Wednesday, July 31, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.co.yamhill.or.us/fair
July 31 - August 3
Yamhill County Fairgrounds



Klamath County Fair
Thursday, August 1, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://www.klamathcountyfair.com/
August 1-4
Klamath County Fair



Wallowa County Fair
Friday, August 2, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://co.wallowa.or.us/community-services/county-fair/
August 2-10
Wallowa County Fairgrounds



Baker County Fair
Sunday, August 4, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.bakerfair.com
August 4-9
Baker County Fairgrounds



Harney County Fair
Sunday, August 4, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.harneyfairgrounds.com
August 4-9
Harney County Fairgrounds



Sherman County Fair
Sunday, August 4, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.shermancountyfairfun.com
August 19-24
Sherman County Fairgrounds



Crook County Fair
Wednesday, August 7, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.crookcountyfairgrounds.com
August 7-10
Crook County Fairgrounds



Douglas County Fair
Wednesday, August 7, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.douglasfairgrounds.com
August 7-10
Douglas County Fairgrounds Complex



Grant County Fair
Wednesday, August 7, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.grantcountyoregon.net
August 7-10
Grant County Fairgrounds



Josephine County Fair
Wednesday, August 7, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://www.josephinecountyfairgrounds.com/
August 7-11
Josephine County Fairgrounds & Events Center



Polk County Fair
Wednesday, August 7, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://www.co.polk.or.us/fair
August 7-10
Polk County Fairgrounds



Tillamook County Fair
Wednesday, August 7, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.tillamookfair.com
August 7-10
Tillamook County Fairgrounds



Umatilla County Fair
Wednesday, August 7, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.umatillacountyfair.net
August 7-10
Umatilla County Fairgrounds



Wheeler County Fair
Wednesday, August 7, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.wheelercountyoregon.com/fair-board
August 7-10
Wheeler County Fairgrounds



Clackamas County Fair
Tuesday, August 13, 2024 at 8:00 am
clackamascountyfair.com
August 13-17
Clackamas County Event Center



Morrow County Fair
Wednesday, August 14, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://www.co.morrow.or.us/fair
August 14-17
Morrow County Fairgrounds



Wasco County Fair
Thursday, August 15, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://www.wascocountyfair.com
August 15-17
Wasco County Fairgrounds



Gilliam County Fair
Thursday, August 29, 2024 at 8:00 am
http://www.co.gilliam.or.us/government/fairgrounds
August 29-31
Gilliam County Fairgrounds



Lake County Fair
Thursday, August 29, 2024 at 8:00 am
https://www.lakecountyor.org/government/fair_grounds.php
August 29 - September 1
Lake County Fairgrounds



Oregon State Fair
Saturday, August 31, 2024 at 8:00 am
www.oregonstateexpo.org
August 31 - September 9
Oregon State Fair & Exposition Center



Linn Laughs LIVE with Adam Corolla
Saturday, September 7, 2024 at 5:00 pm
Linn Laughs LIVE with Adam Corolla 5pm-9pm
Albany, OR


View All Calendar Events


New Rules for Oregon Health Care Providers
Mandatory interpreting services to begin in July

New rules in Oregon that go into effect on July 1st will mandate health care providers reimbursed with public funds to work with credentialed health care interpreters qualified or certified by Oregon Health Authority (OHA).

The rules drafted by OHA reflect changes in the requirement for health care interpreting services in Oregon that were made by the state Legislature’s passage of HB 2359 during the 2021 session.

HB 2359 was chiefly sponsored by Representative Andrea Salinas (D-Lake Oswego), Representative Ricki Ruiz (D-Portland), and Senator Lew Frederick (D-Portland).

These new rules mandate that people for whom English is a second language (those with limited English proficiency) or who use sign language can access more health care.

In addition to requiring publicly reimbursed health care providers to work with a qualified or certified health care interpreter listed on OHA’s 900-plus-member central registry, the law outlines recordkeeping requirements for health care providers and interpreting service companies when they work with a health care interpreter. Among the requirements are that they document the interpreter’s name, central registry number and language interpreted.

The law also requires health care providers to supply appropriate personal protective equipment, or PPE, at no cost to a health care interpreter for onsite interpreting services. And it directs OHA to develop policies and processes to improve the quality, consistency, availability and affordability of training, and qualification and certification standards, for health care interpreters, as well as accuracy and usability of the OHA central registry.

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In addition, OHA – and state boards that license and certify health care professionals – must develop rules to enforce the new requirements for health care interpreting services.

“We are pleased we received participation and input from community partners and pleased that this legislation strengthens and supports language interpretation services in Oregon,” said Leann Johnson, director of the Equity and Inclusion Division at OHA.

One of the organizations OHA is partnering with to eliminate barriers that prevent access to health care interpreter services is Pueblo Unido PDX. The Portland-based nonprofit connects individuals with a vulnerable immigration status in the Pacific Northwest with legal, social and Indigenous language interpretation services.

“Pueblo Unido PDX and the Collective of Indigenous Interpreters of Oregon (CIIO) are grateful for the opportunity to collaborate with OHA to identify and address barriers to healthcare interpreter credentialing for Indigenous language interpreters,” said Cam Coval, executive director of Pueblo Unido PDX.

He said OHA’s Equity and Inclusion Division staff actively listened to feedback from Pueblo Unido and CIIO and “did not hesitate to implement our suggested changes, including eliminating the background check requirement and creating an exception to the GED or educational equivalency requirement for health care interpreters.”

House Bill 2359 allows some exceptions for health care providers in working with a health care interpreter, including that: For more information about HB 2359, OHA’s central registry or health care interpreter services, visit the Health Care Interpreter Program website.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-06-15 17:32:59Last Update: 2022-06-15 17:59:23



Corvallis Adopts $242 Million Budget for Fiscal Year 2023
The City is not immune from inflation-driven cost increases

The Corvallis City Council has now voted to approve an annual budget totaling $242,677,700 for Fiscal Year 2023. Council’s action was the final step in the City’s annual budget process, which began in May with a series of Budget Commission meetings and included deliberations, analysis, and public input.

The new budget goes into effect on July 1, when the City of Corvallis begins its new fiscal year.

The new budget takes a cautious approach to City finances, following a tumultuous year that saw the COVID-19 restrictions lead to inflation concerns and supply shortages that impacted all sectors of the economy. As a full-service municipality, the City is not immune from inflation-driven cost increases.

The FY 2023 budget includes relatively few new full-time employees across the organization. Four new positions were created in the Public Works Department to expand infrastructure maintenance, and one existing position at the Library was augmented to create a new Spanish Outreach Coordinator position.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Requests from various departments to fund seven (7) additional staff positions were not approved due to concerns about ongoing personnel costs.

“We’re entering a new fiscal year with more uncertainty on the horizon,” said City Manager Mark Shepard. “As careful stewards of community resources, it is our obligation to adopt a balanced budget that keeps costs contained as much as possible. As always, we will continually strive to find new resources to continue delivering the many high-quality services that the Corvallis community expects.”


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-06-13 22:57:53Last Update: 2022-06-14 08:37:21



Amendment to Oregon Tolling Policy Ready for Public Review
Guidance for tolling if the state decides to use it for more revenue

The public is invited to review a draft amendment to the Oregon Highway Plan that will guide the state in using tolling as a way to raise funds for transportation system improvements. The comment period is open until August 1st.

An informational webinar about the draft amendment is scheduled for June 30, and a public hearing will be held on July 20 at 1 p.m. Information on how to access these events will be posted on the website when details are available.

What is it?

The Oregon Highway Plan has an existing policy section on tolling. This draft policy amendment proposes an update to that section, which is "Goal No. 6: Tolling." The draft amendment is intended to modernize the state’s pricing and tolling policy. It defines terms, such as congestion pricing, and it offers guidance for the use of revenue and setting rates (but it does not set rates). It also provides the Oregon Transportation Commission with clearer direction for decision making. There are 15 policies in the draft amendment, each with actions to guide implementing the policy.

Note: This amendment is not about whether or not the state should toll roads; instead, it provides guidance for doing so if the state decides to use tolling.

Public input will inform potential revisions to the plan amendment. ODOT says that their goal is to have a final version ready for adoption later this year. If you would like to comment, please review the draft amendment. You may also want to attend the webinar and hearing scheduled for later.

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A D V E R T I S E M E N T

An online comment card on the website will be available soon to submit comments. You can also send an email with comments.

Background

The Oregon Highway Plan is the state’s primary highway guide, establishing a 20-year vision and strategic framework for Oregon’s road system. The current plan was approved by the commission in 1999 and has been modified numerous times, including in 2012 to add the current section on tolling.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-06-13 16:56:22Last Update: 2022-06-13 17:15:53



Washington County Centered on Racial Equity
Should government base decisions on skin color?

Washington County Oregon has begun a multi-year process for re-envisioning the county’s program of Community Participation Organizations (CPOs) and the Committee for Community Involvement (CCI). The process received direction from the Board of County Commissioners in December 2021.

The CPOs and CCI have served as public involvement venues for the county since the 1970s in support of Goal 1 Citizen Involvement under Oregon’s land use planning system. The county now says that the program’s mission has expanded.

“We hear loud and clear the desire for greater programmatic support from the volunteers serving within the CPOs and CCI. We also know that the traditional pathways for the community to engage with their county government can feel more like obstacles. Our ongoing equity work involves building truly accessible platforms and pathways so that we include all voices in our community engagement programs, especially those who have been the least included over time,” said Chief Officer of Equity and Inclusion Latricia Tillman.

The county quotes a Boston University study published in 2018 found that civic engagement structures have historically amplified the voices of those who are “older, male, longtime residents, voters in local elections, and homeowners” and may bias policy discussions in favor of an unrepresentative group of individuals. Washington County has now indicated that they would consider racial equity policies in order to intentionally change this.

“This re-envisioning process will help us align the Community Engagement program with Washington County’s growing and diverse population. By working with the community to establish the foundation and shape of this process now, we can make the current Community Engagement Program even more welcoming to everyone in our Washington County community. We also seek to better align the Community Engagement program with the work to revise the organization’s decades-old community strategic plan,” said Board of County Commissioners Chair Kathryn Harrington.

In presenting the proposed scope of re-envisioning work for the Community Engagement program, county staff identified four work areas: According to Washington County, the next steps for the process will include developing a project team that consists of internal and external partners, conducting further demographic analysis of current CPO boundaries and creating a project plan and timeline for the process.

More information will be available soon. In the meantime, a brief overview of the process for re-envisioning can be found on the Washington County webpage.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-06-12 09:32:50Last Update: 2022-06-15 11:07:36



High Water Means More Interstate Bridge Lifts
Rains have increased Columbia River levels and will mean more and longer Interstate Bridge lifts

Travelers on Interstate 5 should expect more frequent lifts of the Interstate Bridge in the days ahead because recent rains have increased the level of the Columbia River.

The river level is expected to exceed15 feet by early next week. The flood stage at that point on the river is 16 feet. That will mean longer lifts of the bridge spans as both upstream and downstream river traffic must use greater caution in navigating through the faster water. The river level at the Interstate Bridge is generally six to seven feet. Bridge lifts can sometimes be completed in six to eight minutes but lifts now are expected to last up to 20 minutes.

The increased river level has reduced the clearance at the high span, which is at the hump in the bridge at mid-river. That causes more marine traffic to use the lift span along the north side the river. More lifts bring more delays on I-5.

Under maritime law, marine traffic has priority over I-5 highway traffic. However, no lifts are allowed during the morning and evening commute times weekdays from 6:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. and again from 2:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. excepting federal holidays.

Recent rain throughout the Columbia River Basin has contributed to the high water. The Columbia River dams help regulate river volume.

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A D V E R T I S E M E N T

The Columbia River reached the flood stage at the Interstate Bridge in 2017, when it reached 18 feet, and in 2011 when it reached 19 feet. The highest level in recent years came in 1996 when the river reached 24 feet.

The Interstate Bridge is jointly owned by Oregon and Washington and is operated and maintained by ODOT. The northbound span opened Feb. 14, 1917 and the southbound span July 1, 1958.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-06-11 10:45:34



Oregon State Treasury Completes Bond Sales
Oregon State Lottery, General Obligation and Housing Single-Family Mortgage Program

Affordable housing, drinking water improvements, schools, and earthquake readiness are just a few of the projects that will be funded thanks to Oregon State Treasury's recent $418 million General Obligation (GO) bond sale on behalf of the state. The recovery of Lottery sales permitted a long-awaited sale of $218 million bonds for the state's Lottery Program, which will fund a variety of projects including park improvements, building renovations and veteran housing programs. Lasty, an $85 million bond sale for the Oregon Housing Single-Family Mortgage Program will provide support for existing and newly originated Mortgage Loans.

"Bonds are an effective tool that we use to support critical capital projects and invest in Oregon," said Treasurer Tobias Read. "Bond funded projects encourage economic development, enhance sustainability, address critical needs including better access to education, housing and services for wellness and preserve our environment. Our strong stewardship of financial resources permits us to invest in building stronger and healthier communities for Oregonians over the long-run, and that is good for everyone."

Treasury's Debt Management team wrapped up the spring general obligation bond sale in the middle of May after securing low-cost financing in a volatile market environment. The sale includes approximately $200 million in tax-exempt general obligation bond proceeds for approximately twenty-one projects from ten different state government entities. Projects include capital improvements at the Oregon School for the Deaf, improvements to Salem's drinking water system, renovations and accessibility improvements to judicial buildings and the state capitol, and upgrades to various information systems. Additionally, $66 million will fund grant program bonds for implementing seismic upgrades for school districts and emergency services buildings.

Another $175 million of taxable Sustainability Bonds will fund affordable and permanent supportive housing throughout the state, including new home construction and housing for people experiencing chronic homelessness. This was the sixth issuance of sustainability bonds by Oregon Treasury with proceeds dedicated to affordable housing.

The Lottery Bond transaction was priced on April 12, 2022 and was officially closed on May 10, 2022. The sale included approximately $94 million in tax-exempt bonds and $124 million in taxable bonds. The projects funded included upgrades to the Eugene Family YMCA facility, Sherwood Pedestrian/Bike Bridge, Gradin Community Sports Park and various building renovations.

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"The market continues to evolve as the pandemic wanes. With the rise in interest rates as the Federal Reserve seeks to curb inflation, Treasury staff must remain diligent to ensure that the state maintains its high credit profile and broaden its investor outreach to achieve favorable financing results," said Jacqueline Knights, Director of Debt Management at Oregon State Treasury. "Despite record withdrawal of funds from the municipal market, the State's bonds saw significant investor demand, which translates to better pricing – even under volatile market conditions."

In advance of the spring bond sales, Oregon Treasury received updated General Obligation bond ratings from Standard and Poor's, Fitch Ratings, and Moody's Investors Services. In reports published by the three firms, Oregon maintained its respective AA+/AA+/Aa1 ratings along with a stable outlook – a welcome confirmation of the state's fiscal management. Additionally, the State's Lottery Program received a confirmation of stability from Moody's Investors Services and Standard and Poor's, with ratings of Aa2/AAA respectively. Lastly, Oregon Housing and Community Services Department received a rating of Aa2 for the Single-Family Mortgage Revenue Bonds. Moody's also maintains the Aa2 ratings on all outstanding long-term parity debt issued under the Mortgage Revenue Bond Indenture with a stable rating outlook.

The Single-Family Mortgage Bonds transaction was priced on April 5, 2022 and was officially closed on April 27,2022. The sale included approximately $78 million in tax-exempt bonds and $7 million taxable bonds. The proceeds will be used to refund outstanding Oregon Housing and Community Services Department Mortgage Revenue bonds leading to a decrease in department costs. They will also be used to purchase mortgage loans that provide financing for existing, or newly constructed single-family residences.

Treasury has been active in issuing debt for developers who create affordable housing statewide as well as non-profits such as health care institutions. For the calendar year to date, Treasury has worked with our Oregon Housing partners and developers to close fifteen deals totaling $256 million for affordable housing projects across the State.

New Projects Funded by Recently-Sold State Lottery Bonds
SeriesProject Agency/GranteeProject SummaryEstimated Bond Proceeds
2022 ADept of Admin. ServicesCenter for Hope and Safety Hope Plaza$7,500,000
2022 A Dept of Admin. ServicesGradin Community Sports Park2,000,000
2022 A Dept of Admin. ServicesOregon Coast Aquarium Indoor Gallery Improvements5,000,000
2022 ADept of Admin. ServicesParrott Creek Child & Family Services Building Renovation3,500,000
2022 A Dept of Admin. ServicesPhoenix Government and Public Safety Center13,600,000
2022 A Dept of Admin. ServicesPort of Cascade Locks Business Park Expansion2,400,000
2022 A Dept of Admin. ServicesJefferson County Health and Wellness Center5,400,000
2022 A Business OregonCounty Fair Capital Improvements5,000,000
2022 A Dept of Transportation Sherwood Pedestrian/Bike Bridge4,000,000
2022 ADept of Veteran AffairsYMCA Veterans' Affordable Housing 6,000,000
2022 A Parks & Recreation Dept.Main Street Revitalization Grant Program5,000,000
2022 A Water Resources Dept.Deschutes Basin Board of Control Piping10,000,000
2022 AWater Resources Dept.Wallowa Lake Dam Rehabilitation14,000,000
2022 A Water Resources Dept. Water Development Projects15,000,000
2022 A Water Resources Dept.Big Creek Dams Replacement 4,000,000
2022A Total $102,400,000
2022 BDept of Admin. ServicesEugene Family YMCA Facility$15,000,000
2022 B Business OregonLevee Grant Program15,000,000
2022 B Business OregonBrownfields Redevelopment Fund10,000,000
2022 BBusiness OregonSpecial Public Works Fund50,000,000
2022 BHousing & Comm. ServicesWildfire Affordable Housing Supply & Land Acquisition25,000,000
2022B Total $115,000,000
TOTAL $217,400,000


New Projects Funded by Recently-Sold State GO Bonds
SeriesProject AgencyProject NameAmount of Bond Proceeds
2022 Series ADept. of Administrative ServicesExecutive Building Interior & Seismic Renovations$16,000,000
2022 Series ADept. of Administrative ServicesNorth Valley Complex Infrastructure Upgrades/Tenant Improvement30,000,000
2022 Series ADept. of Administrative ServicesPortland State Office Building Improvements3,500,000
2022 Series ADept. of RevenueElectronic Valuation Information System (ELVIS)2,000,000
2022 Series AOregon Military DepartmentResiliency Grant Fund5,000,000
2022 Series AOregon State PoliceCentral Point Office Expansion23,772,889
2022 Series AOregon Youth AuthorityCamp Riverbend Dorm Renovation1,500,000
2022 Series AOregon Youth AuthorityControl Room Renovations895,000
2022 Series AOregon Youth AuthorityJJIS IT System Modernization4,756,531
2022 Series AOregon Youth AuthorityMacLaren Infirmary and Pharmacy Renovation & Expansion979,000
2022 Series AOregon Youth AuthorityMacLaren West Cottages Renovations4,937,800
2022 Series AOregon Youth AuthorityRogue Valley Facility Improvements2,443,900
2022 Series AOregon Youth AuthorityTillamook Dorm Renovation2,000,000
2022 Series AOregon Health AuthorityOSH Salem Well Water Treatment Facility2,395,650
2022 Series ADept. of EducationOregon School for the Deaf ADA Restrooms1,024,625
2022 Series ADept. of EducationOregon School for the Deaf Fire Alarm System Replacement3,091,923
2022 Series ADept. of EducationOregon School for the Deaf Windows Upgrade1,383,452
2022 Series AOregon Parks & Recreation DepartmentState Parks Capital Improvement and Renewal25,000,000
2022 Series ADept. of Fish and WildlifeCapital Improvement and Renewal5,000,000
2022 Series AOregon Liquor Control CommissionLiquor Warehouse Land & Building52,537,265
2022 Series AOregon Liquor Control CommissionLiquor Warehouse Management IT System8,500,000
2022 Series BOregon Housing and Community Services DepartmentLIFT/Permanent Supportive Housing Programs175,000,000
TOTAL $371,718,035
2022 Series COregon Business Development DepartmentSeismic Rehabilitation Grants – Schools55,000,000
2022 Series COregon Business Development DepartmentSeismic Rehabilitation Grants – Emergency Services Buildings20,825,000
TOTAL $75,825,000
TOTAL $447,543,035


New Projects Funded by Recently-Sold Conduit Revenue Bonds
SeriesProject AgencyProject NameAmount of Bond Proceeds
2022AHousing & Community Services Dept.Fremont Manor Apartments$5,400,000
2022BHousing & Community Services Dept.Kentonwood Dimensions Apartments4,037,000
2022CHousing & Community Services Dept.Stillwater Crossing Apartments3,900,000
2022DHousing & Community Services Dept.The Canopy Apartments at Powell36,500,000
2022EHousing & Community Services Dept.Garden Grove Apartments6,330,000
2022FHousing & Community Services Dept.Aloha Family Housing Project16,680,000
2022GHousing & Community Services Dept.Nueva Esperanza Apartments26,359,717
2022HHousing & Community Services Dept.Good Shepherd Village31,425,000
2022IHousing & Community Services Dept.Oregon 4 Apartment Projects23,895,104
2022JHousing & Community Services Dept.Minnesota Place Apartments Project12,987,074
2022KHousing & Community Services Dept.Moorehouse Apartments Project7,870,000
2022LHousing & Community Services Dept.Tigard Senior Housing13,890,000
2022MHousing & Community Services Dept.148th Apartments15,500,000
2022OHousing & Community Services Dept.Shore Pines at Munsel Creek Apartments14,302,000
2022QHousing & Community Services Dept.Maple Apartments37,000,000
TOTAL $256,075,895


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-06-11 09:08:15Last Update: 2022-06-11 09:45:47



Secretary of State Orders Election Audit in Clackamas County
"My mission as Oregon's Secretary of State is to build trust”

Oregon Secretary of State Shemia Fagan has ordered an audit of Clackamas County's May election results. Post-election audits are standard practice in Oregon, but due to a ballot printing error that forced the County to correct thousands of ballots with faulty barcodes, the Secretary directed the County to conduction additional audits, including the results of its ballot duplication process.

"Clackamas County voters can trust the results of their election," Secretary Fagan said. "We can verify that the results are accurate by directing the County to audit its work."

Standard post-election audits involve pulling a statistically significant, random sample of ballots off the shelves and counting them by hand. The results are then compared to the machine count to verify accuracy. The directive issued today requires recounts in addition to the hand recounts required for every county, and it requires election workers in Clackamas to verify that duplicated ballots were transcribed accurately from their original.

Post-election audits have been a standard practice in Oregon since 2008. They are one of the pillars of election integrity that make Oregon's vote-by-mail system the gold standard for modern, secure and transparent elections.

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"My mission as Oregon's Secretary of State is to build trust. But let's face it, weeks of negative headlines eroded Oregonian's trust in elections," Secretary Fagan said. "Even though processing the votes in Clackamas County was slow, it is now my responsibility to confirm that it was done correctly so voters can trust the election results."


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-06-11 09:03:24



TriMet Board approves $1.93 billion budget
Restoring workforce, improving service, adding electric buses are priorities

In a unanimous vote, TriMet’s Board of Directors granted formal approval to the budget for the next fiscal year, setting the agency’s priorities in motion for the second half of 2022 and first six months of 2023. The $1.93 billion dollar budget includes $748.9 million in day-to-day operating requirements and $304.1 million in capital improvements. For the tenth straight year, the budget does not include a base fare increase.

According to Tia York, a spokesperson for TriMet, they are rebuilding a frontline workforce that continues to be impacted by what’s been dubbed the Great Resignation of the COVID-19 pandemic. TriMet would need to increase its current operator ranks by more than 300 to return service to pre-pandemic levels. In January, they reduced service by 9%, to better-match staffing levels, however, resignations, retirements, promotions and departures of operators for other reasons have continued to outpace hiring, leading to canceled buses and trains and system delays for riders.

TriMet has increased the starting pay for new bus operators $25.24 per hour, and with regular, guaranteed pay raises, all operators earn $68,000 per year or more, after three years on the job full time. In addition, TriMet bus operators receive a generous package of employment benefits, which includes no-to-low cost health insurance, life insurance, paid vacation and sick time, and a retirement plan with an 8% employer contribution. In addition, TriMet is offering all newly hired operators a $7,500 hiring bonus.

One of the big improvements riders will see in the coming months is the launch of the first TriMet FX -- or Frequent Express –- bus service, coming this fall to the 15-mile Division Street corridor, between Gresham and Downtown Portland. FX 2-Division will bring more people on board using longer, articulated buses that will allow for faster, all-door boarding and special signal and lane markings to help keep buses moving past traffic congestion.

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A D V E R T I S E M E N T

During the upcoming year, TriMet will also focus on capital investments, including work on major initiatives, that improve the rider experience and our community, including:

--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-06-10 11:15:00



Putting Safety Resource Officers Back in Oregon Schools
“Making sure that kids will remain a protected class”

Salem parents are fighting back against the removal of Safety Resource Officers (SRO) from public schools. Dustin Caldwell, self-employed entrepreneur, father of four, has started a petition. "Put School Resource Officers Back In Our Schools" can be signed online.

“I am just making sure that kids will remain a protected class," said Caldwell. "I want to make sure all children are safe and sound while in our public school system.”

Linda Farrington, a concerned citizen who is helping to promote the campaign says, “last spring many people conflated national concerns about officers in schools that were not true for Salem-Keizer School District officers. Prior to removing officers, Salem-Keizer assessment team was nationally acclaimed, working across many disciplines to coordinate care and work together to de-escalate issues at schools. There was no school to prison pipeline. No evidence of disproportionate arrests per police data—the school district didn’t even keep any data.”

Now, safety is a big issue all year and has only become worse. Teachers are leaving because they don’t feel safe. Kids depression rates have doubled since the onset of the Covid restrictions, and students have more PTSD, higher rates of anxiety, more gender confusion, and higher rates of suicide.

Going back into a social environment is more of a challenge than many suspected as kids acted out bullying, more violence, with less discipline and no SRO available for control.

This new environment has left the more vulnerable to seek acceptance for safety from groups that ploy with identity that leads to confusion and more violence. Oregon is in the lowest group of states for care available to students, and the care that is available often leads them down a dark path. With the lack of concern for the mental health of our students, SROs are needed more than ever.

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Caldwell states, “The district made a political decision to remove officers from our schools and in doing so sacrificed the safety of our youth. We have to hold our public officials accountable for their actions and when it comes to the safety of our kids we have to act fast and hard. I encourage taxpayers and parents to email the district and let their voices be heard.”

The Oregon Department of Education, State Board of Education will hold its meeting on June 16 at 9 AM, by video conference livestream.

The Board will only accept written public comments for this meeting, but claims they will consider all public comments. Submit written comments or testimony by email or by physical mail addressed to: Clearly label the subject line as: “Public comment” or “Testimony” and include the topic. Example: “Public Comment: School Safety.”

All written public comment will be posted to Boardbook, where you can view the agenda and materials.

Let the Oregon State Board know of your concerns over student safety for the state, and contact your local school board and superintendent.


--Donna Bleiler

Post Date: 2022-06-10 09:40:57Last Update: 2022-06-10 10:40:29



Multnomah County Roads Littered with Human Poop
Perennial pooper still tossing bags of human waste along East County roads

New neighbors are moving in next door on Corbett’s S.E. Curtis Drive, and Lisa Kinney is worried.

She is fairly sure the new arrivals haven’t yet been warned to watch out for the poop-filled shopping bags that appear along their road from time to time, placed every few feet, along the fog line. Even though County health officials are able to scoop up many, others get snatched by passing dogs or smashed by passing cars.

It’s happened for nearly five years now. Sometimes it’s like clockwork, with the bags dropped regularly on Sunday nights. Other times, months might go by, and then six or seven bags will appear, on Curtis Drive or some other east County road. Kinney wishes the perpetrator would reach out for help. It’s a plea County health officials share.

“I think they are in a situation where maybe we could help them,” Kinney said. “I don’t imagine someone who has a bathroom would do something like this.”

Multnomah County Code Enforcement is seeking the public’s help identifying whoever is responsible for disposing of the bags, filled with human poop and kitty litter, along rural roads like Kinney’s near Troutdale, Springdale and Corbett.

The bags, often plastic shopping bags from Wal-Mart or Dollar Tree, have been dumped at nearly 500 sites since late 2018, usually during early morning hours, primarily along the following stretches of road: ​Multnomah County Code Enforcement handles illegal dumping in unincorporated areas of Multnomah County. A majority of illegal dumps are large household garbage. But over the past five years, Enforcement Officer Dave Thomson has picked up hundreds of bags of human waste dumped on local roadways.

Enforcement Officer Dave Thomson has worked long and late hours trying to stop someone disposing of human waste along County roads.

Some bags have remained intact, but some have been ripped open and splattered by passing cars, with poop left to wash into the drainage ditch. And that’s a problem: Human feces can carry diseases, and when that poop washes into drainage ditches, it can contaminate waterways where people spend time.

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Thomson does his best to recover bags promptly, but doody duty competes with his many other roles.

“I have a million other functions,” he said.

According to the county, on any given day Thomson might inspect a business that fails to adhere to clean air laws, investigate illegal dumping of a couch and fridge, levy fines for illegal livestock in the City of Portland or for a junk car in Maywood Park, chase down any of the County’s 3,000 facilities that might fail to renew their licenses, or post a closure notice to a business that refuses to cooperate with Public Health.

“Your eyes would glaze if you knew everything on my plate. That’s why I can’t afford to spend my time scooping up poop,” he said. “There’s nothing in my job description that requires me to clean up human poop, but it's such an unsanitary thing. The community doesn’t deserve this.”

Thomson urges whoever is dumping the poop to either stop or to reach out for help.

“We want to understand why the person might be doing this,” Thomson said. “Perhaps this person doesn’t have a bathroom or another way of disposing of their waste. We’re not interested in punishment. We want to help them get the support they need.”

If you spot someone in the act of illegal dumping, Thomson asks that you don’t try and stop the person. Instead, get a license plate number and vehicle description, and dial 9-1-1.

If you spot these bags or any other illegally disposed materials in unincorporated Multnomah County, call Environmental Health at 503-988-3464 or email them.


--Bruce Armstrong

Post Date: 2022-06-09 18:01:44Last Update: 2022-06-09 18:23:30



Opportunities Exist on State Boards
Oregonians encouraged to apply for State boards and commissions

Governor Kate Brown is calling on Oregonians who have an interest in serving the state to apply for membership on any one of the 150 state boards and commissions that are actively recruiting new members, including two new councils -- the Emergency Preparedness Advisory Council and the Local Government Emergency Management Advisory Council.

“State board and commission members are dedicated Oregonians who bring a diverse set of backgrounds and life experiences to address a wide range of issues facing our state. They are vital participants in statewide decision-making and have the opportunity to participate in developing a wide variety of important governmental policies,” said Governor Brown. “I encourage all Oregonians with interest in serving our great state and helping make it better for all those who call it home to apply.”

Public members of boards and commissions are people who may not have regular, ongoing experience in a specific topic area, but have a general interest in a particular board or commission’s work arena. Major issues range from consumer protection, economic development, and education, to conservation and health care — all of which are critical to the ongoing success of the state.

Governor Brown is committed to ensuring that all boards and commissions represent the growing age, racial, and gender diversity of the state. This is an amazing opportunity to pool collective viewpoints, visions, and hopes for Oregon — and all community members are welcome and encouraged to serve.

To submit an application, please visit the state boards and commissions website and follow the instructions to apply.


--Staff Reports

Post Date: 2022-06-08 09:58:03



USS Oregon Officially Commissioned
The third U.S. Navy ship launched to bear the name Oregon

Oregon is honored with a third commissioned ship. This one is a nuclear-powered attack submarine named USS Oregon. On May 28, the Navy commissioned the fast-attack submarine USS Oregon (SSN 793) in a traditional ceremony at Naval Submarine Base New London, Connecticut.

USS Oregon is the third U.S. Navy ship launched to bear the name Oregon, but first in more than a century. The first was named after the Oregon Territory before Oregon became a state. It was a brigantine in service from 1841-1845 and served in explorations.

The second was an Indiana-class battleship commissioned in 1896 and ultimately decommissioned for the final time in 1919. She served as a vessel and later as an Indiana-class battleship. The Oregon served in the Spanish-American War and helped destroy the famous fleet of Spanish Admiral Pascual Cervera y Topete.

Oregon again presents her flag in a Memorial Day event as the USS Oregon. It was the first commissioning ceremony in three years due to COVID-19 restrictions on large gatherings.

The submarine Oregon was previously christened in a traditional ceremony at General Dynamics Corp.’s Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, Connecticut, on Oct. 5, 2019.

The commissioning ceremonies of the USS Vermont and USS Delaware were also delayed and will be held retroactively.

“Oregonians are deeply honored that the 20th Virginia-class submarine will bear the name of our state,” said Governor Kate Brown in her keynote speech.

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Commanding officer of USS Oregon, Commander Lacy Lodmell said, “The passion, grit and enthusiasm of Oregon’s crew has carried the ship to sea and were vital to the completion of construction and testing. This is without a doubt the finest crew I have ever had the pleasure to serve with.”

Dana L. Richardson, the wife of former Chief of Naval Operations Admiral John Richardson of Corvallis, is the ship sponsor.

During the commissioning event, Dana Richardson gave the crew the traditional order to “man our ship and bring her to life,” after which Oregon’s sailors ceremonially ran aboard the submarine.

The commissioning is just in time as news creeps out that we are in need of national defense along our shores.


--Donna Bleiler

Post Date: 2022-06-08 09:42:46Last Update: 2022-06-08 09:58:58



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